Resistance when shooting from rifle and carbine

Greetings.

Since this is my first article for Last day club, Let me spend a minute and say: if you are reading this site, then you are in the right place. LDC – one of the few places where real people write real-time articles in real time. The site administrators and the rules adopted here in most cases do not miss misinformation, information from unverified sources and other inventions that some people try to publish almost daily. Hats off to those who hold the reins and follow the road. On it I will start, at last, to business.

The document in question is US Army Combat Training Instruction: Shooting Stability (Us Army TC-3-22-9: Rifle and Carbine Stability, where TC is Training Circular, the link to which you will find at the end of the article (editor’s note), which is currently US Army replaces the FM Field Regulations 3-22.9.

I was fortunate to participate in this work as a leading specialist, representatives of many formations, editors, artists were involved in it, and at a certain stage these materials were read in almost every major army unit. I tell you this in order to illustrate what was said above and to show the scope of the work.

By writing these articles we will be able to convey the necessary information to those who will use our book, quickly and correctly. In addition, it serves to receive feedback in the form of a significant number of comments, questions and thoughts. That, in turn, will be the starting point for our next book, in which we write about how to use recommendations Instructions on combat training with a maximum benefit for a minimum of time.

POSITION & quot; LOW READINESS & quot; (LOW READY) 1. The axis of view coincides with the direction of the barrel of a rifle 2. The field of view and aiming is 45 degrees left and right from the axis of the barrel 3. The soldier maintains steady control over the weapon, holding it by the pistol grip, and removing the finger from the trigger 4. The barrel of the weapon is tilted 30-45 degrees, freeing the field of view for observation.POSITION OF “LOW READY” (LOW READY)1. The axis of view coincides with the direction of the rifle barrel.2. The field of view and aiming is 45 degrees to the left and to the right of the barrel axis.3. The soldier maintains steady control of the weapon, holding it by the pistol grip, and removing the finger from the trigger4. The barrel of the weapon is tilted 30-45 degrees, freeing the field of view for observation.

I was often asked: “what was in a person’s thoughts when he wrote this?” – these are the thoughts that I want to convey to you. Our last articles dealt with the shot process, competitive psychology and the learning process in adults. With the same article, we begin to set out the details, starting with stability when shooting, since the first thing in the process being described is to achieve it.

For many years, the army considered a stable position as the cornerstone of the shooting. I do not know about you, but the very idea of ​​maintaining a stable body position when moving seems wild to me. For this reason, we have come to the concept of sustainability. I can understand it like this – in any situation, keep the rifle in the most stable position. In 1966, the army was discussing the factors of reliable holding of weapons that are applicable when moving much better than giving the body a stable position. This is another example of the fallacy of following the premise of “we have always done so.”

In the Manual on Combat Training There are diagrams of 12 different positions for shooting, as well as a discussion of less common approaches, such as this: the higher you are above the ground, the less stable your position. Although experienced shooters understand, this manual is intended for all military personnel, and the sooner we discuss the issue, the sooner it will be understood.

Positions are selected and drawn in a single spirit. The reason we did this is simple. I have no idea how a guy sitting in a spacious, air-conditioned office at Fort Benning can know for sure which of the positions will be the best during a battle, so the best we can do is provide information and hope that the commanders of the units for understanding will work out each of them at least with baling.

Stability when shooting a rifle

POSITION FOR SHOOTING THE LEG (WITHOUT PUSH) 1. Position: the shooter rests on his elbows so that the weapon does not quiver 2. Leg position: apart, heels lie on the ground, foot on the shooting side is slightly bent at the knee to reduce tension 3. Center of gravity: the supine position allows the shooter to cuddle up to the ground for maximum stability 4. Elbow of the firing hand: ensures the stability of the weapon 5. Elbow of the non-firing hand: is almost under the weapon, as far as is convenient 6. Shooting hand: covers the pistol grip weave, the finger is removed from the descent to readiness for opening fire 7. Non-shooting hand: tightly hugs the forearm 8. Butt plate: at the middle point of the shoulder to absorb recoil 9. Tab: tight 10. Arrow-weapon angle: the body is almost at one line with the direction of the weapon-targetPOSITION FOR LIFT BURNING (WITHOUT IMPOSITION)1. Position: the shooter rests on his elbows so that the weapon does not tremble2. Leg position: apart, heels on the ground, foot on the shooting side slightly bent at the knee to reduce stress3. Center of gravity: the recumbent position allows the shooter to cuddle up to the ground for maximum stability4. Shooting arm elbow: ensures weapon stability5. The elbow of a non-firing hand: almost under the arms, as comfortable as possible6. Shooting hand: covers the pistol grip, finger removed from the descent to readiness for opening fire7. Non-Shooting Hand: Covers the Handguard Tightly8. Butt plate: in the middle point of the shoulder to absorb recoil momentum.9. Tab: dense10. The angle of the arrows-weapon: the body of the arrow almost in line with the direction of the weapon-target

Task stability when shooting simple – properly aim and fire a weapon without disturbing the sight. This principle applies to any shooting and has been considered fundamental since time immemorial. Sustainability is the first thing we need to achieve, and there are hundreds and thousands of posts on the Internet. Debates on stance, grip and stop position flare up every day.

I am not going to continue them here, but I will say the following: if you are not stable enough to aim, or if you are too uncomfortable to maintain a stable position, you are doing something wrong.

The necessary stability comes from the ability to properly aim and hold the scope until the bullet leaves the barrel. This also determines how stable you should be. This is based on the shooter’s abilities and shooting conditions. An experienced shooter shooting from a distance of 5 yards at a 40-inch target needs quite a bit. And if the target is reduced to one inch, the required level of stability will increase significantly.

Another example is a ten-inch goal a hundred yards away and the same goal a thousand yards away. Instruction speaks precisely about this, mentioning the size of the target, the distance to the target and the shooter’s abilities.

I achieve the degree of stability that I need

POSITION FOR STANDING FIRING (WITHOUT IMPAIRMENT) 1. Position: less stable than lying, but allows highly effective shooting 2. Leg position: firmly on the ground, shoulder width 3. Rack / center of gravity: aggressive leaning towards the target 4. Elbow of the shooting hand: pressed to the side arrow 5. Elbow of the non-shooting hand: several out 6. Shooting hand: covers the pistol grip, the finger is removed from the descent to readiness to open fire 7. Non-shooting hand: extended forward as far as possible, for neutralization of return and transfer of sight 8. Zatyl butt knife: rested on the shoulder as high as possible to absorb the recoil impulse 9. Tab: dense 10. The angle of the arrows-weapons: the body of the shooter is approximately 115-125 degrees with the direction of the weapon-targetPOSITION FOR STANDING FIRING (WITHOUT POSTING)1. Position: less stable than lying, but allows high-performance shooting2. Leg position: firmly on the ground, shoulder width apart3. Rack / center of gravity: aggressive tilt toward the target4. The elbow of the shooting hand: pressed to the side of the arrow5. Elbow of a non-shooting hand: somewhat outward6. Shooting hand: covers the pistol grip, finger removed from the descent to readiness for opening fire7. Non-shooting arm: pulled forward as far as possible to neutralize recoil and transfer of sight.8. Butt plate: rested on the shoulder as high as possible to absorb the recoil impulse9. Tab: dense10. The angle of the arrow-weapon: the body of the arrow is approximately 115-125 degrees with the direction of the weapon-target

Resilience is also closely related to recoil compensation or recovery after a shot, depending on who you are talking to. The greater the stability, the less time it takes to recover, and the faster the aiming can be made again, the sooner the next shot will occur.

Often you can see comments about “splits”, the pauses between shots. The best hands reduce the split to 0.15-0.18 seconds and hit targets, while maintaining acceptable accuracy. They are able to compensate for recoil, aim and shoot for 0.15 seconds. It is easy to understand that from an unstable position they could not have shot and fired so quickly.

Summarizing everything said together: take a position that is sufficiently stable for aiming at this target and allows you to hold the weapon reliably enough to prepare for the next shot. Whenever you can, use a support other than muscle — be it a barricade, a vehicle wing, a foot bag, a bipod, a gun shop, or a wall.

Although it sounds like a given, it is not. Think of the heavy legacy caused by the test shooting. To pass the test are strictly specified position for shooting, sometimes they are not studied at all in training. When people familiar with only a few positions, who are not accustomed to “cheating” and relying on something, find themselves in a stressful situation, they most likely will not use an emphasis, trying to use an independent position without support, because of the long training sessions wrong technique at the level of “muscle memory”. This means that the chances of making a slip increase significantly, which is actually completely undesirable.

Stay tuned, the next article will be about aiming.

For those interested – download Instruction in combat training can be here – TCx3-22.9.pdf

By Ash Hess
Original article: Us Army TC-3-22-9: Rifle and Carbine Stability

Firearms

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