Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

Different systems of guards can be used both in the operation of one type of pasta, and in various designs of pastes. Despite the simplicity of the details of the triggers, they are made, as a rule, at home, as they require more thorough decoration and high-quality material. 

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard trap systems for maw traps.

The wood used for work must be thoroughly dried, this will avoid deformation (bends, jamming, etc.). In some cases, it is rational to use fragments of bones or horns as material.

It is necessary to have a spare set of parts of the trigger used (repair kit), as they often fail, get lost in the snow or be pulled away by the beast. Installation of the trigger mechanism of the mouth is carried out in such a way that the body of the beast, which is the object of fishing, is completely under the yoke of the mouth. When making jaws on a fox or arctic fox, this distance is approximately 60-70 cm from the front pair of stakes of the corridor or stakes of collars.

In those cases where the bait is located close to the wall of the corridor, the stakes of the corridor should be driven closer to each other in order to avoid the animal being squandered by the structure outside the mouth. Trigger systems arranged inside the mouth have a number of features. Shelter from snow by oppression and the walls of the corridor makes it difficult to snow.

Thawing them by the wind or a beast not in the mouth is less likely. The disadvantage of this system is that the details of the guard are often broken, since they are directly under the yoke of the mouth. An inconvenient is the way to guard.

Various grapple guard systems.

System number 1.

A low wooden tetrahedral truncated pyramid is placed on the floor of the mouth inside the corridor, approximately in its center. The oppression is supported by a watch peg, the lower end of which abuts against the tip of the guard-stick placed on the pyramid, on the opposite end of which a bait is planted. As soon as the beast that enters the mouth touches the bait, the balance of the entire system is disturbed, the watch peg jumps off the wand, slides along the edge of the pyramid and bends down upon the beast.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

As can be seen from the above description, in this mouth (used on the Yamal Peninsula) there are no many other indispensable parts of the types of mouth: a hoe, a roma, a combat and trigger sim card, etc. This greatly simplifies the construction of this mouth, but at the same time makes it extremely unreliable In action. So, due to the ease of self-timer, the whole system can work under the influence of winds, etc. Mouths with this kind of trigger device are found mainly box type.

System number 2.

A hole of 1 cm in diameter is drilled in one of the corridor stakes (a cleft mouth – in one of the horizontal poles). A wooden peg is driven into the hole. A guard ring with a bait attached to it is put on this peg. The ring is made in advance from freshly cut willow or bird cherry twig. Bark from the branch should be removed. For better flexibility, hold the branch over steam or lower it into boiling water for several minutes.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

The bait is held by notches or not fully cut knots. The bait on the rings is punctured in the hut, and then left in the cold, so you need a double set of rings to use this system. A combat sim card (a rope tied to the tail end of a hoe) has a small loop at the end, which is worn on the very tip of a hammered peg.

The eyelet can be replaced with a small L-shaped fragment of the branch, which makes it easier to guard the mouth. The combat sim card from the hack to the end of the peg passes inside the mouth corridor. The beast, pulling the bait, tears the ring off the peg and thereby shifts the peg and the eyelet (L-shaped branch) of the combat sim card. As a result, oppression falls.

System number 3.

The persistent peg is driven into a hole in one of the central stakes of the mouth. At the end of the combat sim card (the rope connecting the hoe with the guard) a wooden hook-guard is attached that has the shape of the letter “G”. The trigger sim card stretches at the height of the chest of the arctic fox, fox, etc. It attaches tightly to the opposite wall, its other end is tied to a guard, also a wooden hook, but slightly different in shape than the gatehouse.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

A hole was drilled in the lower part of the guard, through which a ring of hard rope or thick hair was passed. The ring should have sufficient rigidity so that when unstressed, the guard falls from the stub, and does not hang on it, preventing the yoke from falling. The rope ring is put on the very end of the persistent peg, and the hook-guard clings to the hook-gatehouse.

The bait in this design is placed under the laid-on polik, in the middle part of which a through hole of 8-10 cm is drilled. The beast that enters the mouth, tends to the bait, rests its chest on the watchdog SIM, moves the guard from the gatekeeper, which activates the trigger system. The weak link in this guarding system is the stubborn peg; it most often breaks when the yoke falls. The length of the persistent peg must be reduced to a minimum that does not interfere with the operation of the entire mechanism.

System number 4.

The willow branch serves as a guardian of the Zyryansk rabbit’s mouth, tied at one end to the free end of the hoe or inserted into the split tail end of the L-shaped stake, driven in the middle of the mouth corridor. The branch should pass freely between the logs of oppression. Hare, gnawing a branch or throwing off the loop holding the branch from the stake, overturns itself.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

System number 5.

The trigger mechanism of the Surgut cleft maw. The free end of the rope shown in the figure is tied to the long arm of the hoe. At present, the cleft palate has become obsolete and has been supplanted by more productive traps..

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

Trigger systems with external mouth trap guard.

System number 6.

A hole with a diameter of 1-1.5 cm is drilled in one of the stakes (in a box mouth in one of the horizontal poles) of the corridor. A wedge-shaped peg-guard is inserted into the hole, on the thick end of which there is a bait. A loop of a combat simka is put on the thin end of the guard, the second end of the simka is tied to the long shoulder of the hoe holding the oppression in a horizontal position. The guard must exit the hole freely.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

System number 7.

At 10 cm from the wall of the corridor a wooden fork-slingshot is driven into the ground. A thin wedge-shaped wand-guard with a bait at the end freely passes through the drilled hole into the cola of the corridor. At the end of the combat sim card (a rope tied to the large shoulder of the hoe) a small stick-guard with rounded edges is tied. The guard is threaded into the fork of the slingshot and held in this position by the guard. As soon as the beast grabs the bait, the guard will jump out of the fork of the slingshot.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

System number 8.

On the outside of the 10 cm corridor, a watch stake with a drilled hole is driven in. A persistent peg is hollowed into the hole of the watchdog. A small notch is made above the peg in the guard stake. At the end of the combat sim card, a small diamond-shaped guard-post is tied in the middle. With the yoke raised, the gatehouse at one end abuts the notch, and the other holds the rope loop worn on the stub.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

The loop that holds the gatehouse fits at the end of the trigger SIM, the second end of which is fastened tightly to the opposite end of the corridor. The bait is either mounted on a wooden ring through which the thread of the trigger sim card passes, or laid in the hole of the false floor, as described above (see system No. 3). The beast, pulling the bait, mounted on the trigger sim card, or hitting the trigger sim card with his chest, tending to the bait, laid under the patch, removes the loop from the stub peg holding the gatehouse.

System number 9.

From the outside of the corridor, stepping back 10 cm from the edge, a guard stake is driven in. A small persistent peg is driven into the hole drilled in the watch stake. From above 5-6 cm above the persistent peg, a hole is cut in the guard stake. A gatehouse is attached to the end of the combat sim card, which looks like a small stick with flattened ends. When the yoke is raised, the gatehouse is inserted at one end into the recess of the guard stake and is fixed in this position by a guard with a U-shaped notch.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

One edge of the cutout is wound by a persistent peg, the second holds the edge of the gatehouse. A trigger SIM (a thin kapron thread) is attached to the guard, the second end of which is tied around the opposite stake of the mouth corridor. The bait is arranged in two ways described earlier in systems No. 3 and No. 8.

System number 10.

It is a variant of another engineering solution of system No. 9. As a guard stake, a branch stump is used with a perpendicular outgoing knot replacing the thrust peg. A guard is made of a fragment of a branch, the knot of which serves to secure the bait. Making a gatehouse and guarding the mouth is completely similar to the system described above.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

System number 11.

Mouth trap triggers, options and various guard systems for maw traps.

It differs from the above in that instead of a combat sim card, this design uses a plate, at one end of which a through hole is drilled into which the thrust peg freely passes, and a small stick is firmly fixed to the hole drilled at the other end or a nail is driven in. The absence of ropes simplifies the operation of this system.

Based on materials from the book Encyclopedia of the Hunter.
Rudenko F.A., Semashko V.Yu., Cherenkov S.E., Matyunin M.M..

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